5 Books That Every Med Student Must Read

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Yes, I know you’re pages deep in the USMLE First Aid, or Guyton’s Physiology book, but I am declaring a study break right now! As a matter of fact, you’re already on the #medcute site, so I guess you already know it’s time for a break.  There is more to life than the Krebs cycle and semiological techniques, and sometimes a good read- especially about this world that we’re dedicating ourselves to may be just what the doctor ordered!  Below are 5 books that you need to add to your weekend reading list, and if you’re like me, for those times that you just… can’t… study… anything… more….😴😴

1. The Devil Wears Scrubs

This one grabs your attention right off the bat- “This patient is the fattest man I’ve ever seen in my life…”  PC? Probably not, but author Freida McFadden tells the story of a medical intern’s first year with enough dark humor to have you shake your head while you chuckle at the absurdity of what life is like on the wards for a scrub…. also, for those of you Grey’s Anatomy fans,  the ward drama will leave you flipping page after page for more. Is intern year hell? Well, you be the judge.  Oh, and did I mention that it ships free right to where you are?

2. The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

This year has taught us that not only do #BLACKLIVESMATTER, they’ve always mattered. The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks reminds us of this. Many do not know the story of Henrietta Lacks- a normal black woman who has changed the face of biology and genetics study forever- without her knowledge or permission. It calls us to remember the person, the life behind HeLa, the first immortal human cell line and brings to the fore that one life really does matter. It will make you question if the ends really do justify the means in medical and scientific research. Click the title. You won’t regret it.

3. The Intern Blues: The Timeless Classic About the Making of a Doctor

Hey you! Do you really know what you’re getting yourself into? Dr. Robert Marion gives it to you straight up with the side that we don’t always think about when we picture those white coats. What do you do when the police count on your “expert” opinion when a child comes in with a septic hip? How prevalent is depression among first-year doctors? Is it even worth it? Look before you leap with The Intern Blues.

4. Med School RX: Getting In, Getting Through, and Getting on with Doctoring

Maybe you haven’t started the med journey yet, but you are convinced that it’s for you. Maybe you’re not even sure where to start and what to do to even get into med school. Maybe you’re smack in the middle of your med school years and just need the push to continue. Whatever the case, this trusty hand book, by medical education gurus Kaplan is a must have. And guess what, if you use the link, shipping’s free too! Double win!

5. The Doctor Will See You Now: Recognizing and Treating Endometriosis

Pre-conceived notions in the medical community surrounding race and gender are rife. Among these are ideas than females have higher pain thresholds, or that complaints surrounding menstrual symptoms are dramatic or calls for attention. Every year, countless women suffer in silence with one of the most severe uterine diseases: Endometriosis. If you are looking into family med or Gynaecology- or you simply want to make sure that you become the doctor that believes their patients and does right by them, this book with personal stories from women who suffer from or have suffered from endometriosis and clinical neglect is for you. Oh, and free shipping. What more could a med student want?

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Any suggestions for books we should try? Tell us in the comments below! Stay #medcute!

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